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A Change in Lifestyle, A Change in Nutrition (Week 4)

April is National Cancer Awareness Month, in recognition of this, we have decided to highlight this week for you, some of the changes experienced and needed in your diet as a cancer survivor.

There is no “magic bullet” for increased health and maintained wellness in the body. The human body is composed of many different systems, all requiring different things to stay working at an optimum level, and there’s simply no single, simple answer to the equation.

The only proven way to stay healthy after beating cancer is to ensure that your diet is a healthy one, and that you maintain an appropriate level of engaging, physical activity.

Having a healthy diet can be simple though. Take a look at your plate. At least 2/3 of the food you see on there should be vegetables, fruits, whole grains and beans. Only about 1/3 or less should consist of fish, poultry, lean red meat or dairy products. Anything else, such as processed red meat, should only appear occasionally.

When it comes to the vegetables and fruits, make sure that the canned varieties are packed in water or juice instead of syrup. For frozen vegetables, check the nutrition label to make sure that there isn’t any added sugar or sodium, since those should be avoided.

This information and much more can be found in our handout: “Nutrition and the Cancer Survivor” One of our Anniversary Special Items in our catalog and at www.ncescatalog.com.  Item # 4625

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CBS and FDA Warn Against Too Much Salt

Yesterday on the CBS Early Show, Dr. Jennifer Ashton showed Americans the dangers of eating too much salt, and to clarify a misunderstanding concerning the Institute of Medicine and the Food & Drug Administration.

Contrary to popular belief, the FDA will not be cracking down and limiting the salt in American products and the salt intake of Americans. The Institute of Medicine however, did ask the FDA to help create awareness of the problems with having too much salt causes.

The average American consumes 1 ½ tablespoons of salt each day, which is over twice the recommended amount. Although the health community has known for 40 years that there has been at the very least a casual link between salt and heart disease, but it’s now a very real connection and cause for concern.

It’s estimated that by reducing the average American’s salt intake by just one teaspoon a day could save over 150,000 lives from heart disease.

No one is asked people to put away the salt shaker. Since only about 23% of an American’s salt come from the added salt you sprinkle on your meal, it’s less of a concern. Where the real trouble lies is in the processed foods that you eat, where the other 77% of your salt lies.

Watch what you eat, and keep an eye on the grams of salt and sodium in that lunch you’re having. It might just save your life.

Check out the video here!  http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=6417471n&tag=cbsnewsTwoColUpperPromoArea

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Sugar As An Addiction: Fact or Fiction?

Yesterday on Good Morning America, added sugar in foods, and its impact on Americans was a topic of discussion. Too much sugar in diets has been linked to the onset of diabetes, heart attacks and strokes. Considering the typical American consumes around 156 pounds of sugar a year, that’s quite a concern.

The American Heart Association recommends an upper limit of about 9 teaspoons of added sugar a day for a man, and about 6 added teaspoons a day for a woman. What’s more likely, is that people are eating about 4 to 6 times that amount.

That’s a cause for concern.

Many natural foods have sugar in them, such as grapes, which is fine, since they also come with so many vitamins and minerals as well. It’s when sugar is added to them, either in processing, or by hand, where it has the real danger. Most foods have sugar added to them merely for taste’s sake, without regard to how healthy it may be for our culture.

In the same GMA piece, the good doctor makes the claim that we, as a culture, are addicting ourselves to sugar by eating so many artificial sugars. While it makes sense in my head, research to this point has not made any definitive link between artificial sugars and addiction.

It’s a good argument in theory, and it wouldn’t hurt to lay off of the extra sugar, but addiction, I’d wager it’s not.

Watch the video here!  http://ow.ly/1BUAA

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Heart Health, A Stepping Situation (Week 3)

April is National Hypertension Month. In recognition of this, we have decided to highlight this week for you some exercise suggestions to help increase your heart health and lower your risk of hypertension.

We all know that exercise can keep you healthy and fit. Concerning the heart, it can also help lower blood pressure, improve overall cardiovascular health, reduce the risk of heart disease, and even reduce the risk of certain types of cancer. Also, it just helps make you feel younger and more energetic.

Sometimes, though, it’s hard to find the time to get out and exercise. Maybe your job involves a lot of sitting or inactivity, and sometimes there’s even less activity at home. There are easy ways to get small amounts of exercise into your workday; ways that don’t require any gyms or special equipment.

The average American takes 5,000 steps a day. By using a pedometer (like our Spri Pedometer!), you can see if you’re hitting that average, or if you could use a little more activity. The goal for people looking to increase their heart health is 10,000 steps a day.

Doing things like parking your car farther away from the building, taking public transportation, or climbing stairs more often can significantly impact your health in a very positive way, plus have added bonuses as well. Who wouldn’t want to completely forget about fighting traffic?

These tips and much more can be found in the book: “The DASH Diet Action Plan.” One of the many heart health items in our catalog and at www.ncescatalog.com.  Item # 3732.

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Asian Pork Tenderloin

Ingredients

    2 tablespoons sesame seeds
    1 teaspoon ground coriander
    1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper
    1/8 teaspoon celery seed
    1/2 teaspoon minced onion
    1/4 teaspoon ground cumin
    1/8 teaspoon ground cinnamon
    1 tablespoon sesame oil
    1 pound pork tenderloin, sliced into 4 4-ounce portions

Directions

Preheat the oven to 400 F. Lightly coat a baking dish with cooking spray.

In a heavy frying pan, add the sesame seeds in a single layer. Over low heat, cook the seeds stirring constantly until they look golden and give off a noticeably toasty aroma, about 1 to 2 minutes. Remove the seeds from the pan to cool.

In a bowl, add the coriander, cayenne pepper, celery seed, minced onion, cumin, cinnamon, sesame oil and toasted sesame seeds. Stir to mix evenly.

Place the pork tenderloin in the prepared baking dish. Rub the spices on both sides of the pork pieces. Bake until no longer pink, about 15 minutes. Or bake until a meat thermometer reaches 160 degrees (medium) or 170 degrees (well-done).

Transfer the pork tenderloin to warmed plates. Serve immediately.

Nutritional Analysis

(per serving)

Calories 196 Cholesterol 74 mg
Protein 25 g Sodium 57 mg
Carbohydrate trace Fiber 0 g
Total fat 10 g Potassium 442 mg
Saturated fat 2 g Calcium 53 mg

Mayo Clinic Staff. (2009, June 1). Recipe: asian pork tenderloin. Retrieved from http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/healthy-recipes/NU00460

Picture from: http://fortheloveofcooking-recipes.blogspot.com/2009/04/asian-pork-tenderloin.html

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A Change in Lifestyle, A Change in Nutrition (Week 3)

April is National Cancer Awareness Month, in recognition of this, we have decided to highlight this week for you, some of the changes experienced and needed in your diet as a cancer survivor.

It’s common knowledge your doctor recommends a healthy diet in order to promote overall heath, but did you realize that there are some healthy eating choices you can make that might improve the chances of keeping your cancer from returning? 

A healthful diet that’s full of a variety of vegetables, fruits, whole grains and beans is especially helpful as a cancer survivor. The more in your diet, and the less red meat in that same diet, can help fight cancer at several stages. The vitamins and minerals gained through this diet help the body defend itself against cancer, as well as other diseases.

Many of the protective plant phytochemicals are very helpful in seeking out toxins and carcinogens in the body and eliminating them. This protects cells, and helps them to make repairs when cell damage occurs.

Combined with a healthy amount of physical activity, this improved lifestyle can greatly increase your chances of preventing remission, and living a full, longer life.

This information and much more can be found in our handout: “Nutrition of the Cancer Survivor” One of our Anniversary Special Items in our catalog and at www.ncescatalog.com.  Item # 4625.

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Heart Health, A Salty Situation (Week 2)

April is National Hypertension Month. In recognition of this, we have decided to highlight this week for you, some exercise suggestions increase your heart health and lower your risk of hypertension.

Lowering the amount of sodium and salt we consume is a tricky business, but it can be done. Since salt and sodium have been directly linked to heart disease, high blood pressure and hypertension; reducing the amount you intake is a high priority in changing your diet.

Below are some tips on how to reduce the amount of sodium in your diet:

About 85% of our sodium comes from foods right off the shelves, not from salt in the shaker. Taking a little time to research your grocery shopping can go a long way towards lower your risk of hypertension.

Most foods you can think of have a low-sodium alternative. Knowing how to find these alternatives is a big step in the right direction.

Many times, there will be a huge difference in sodium levels, just between brands. Make sure to read the labels to find which has the lowest amounts of sodium and try them out.

Many over-the-counter health aids, like ibuprofen, aspirin, antacids and dentifrices have surprisingly large amounts of sodium (even up to 760mg!). Check with your pharmacist or healthcare provider for low sodium alternatives.

This information and much more can be found in the book: “Pocket Guide to Lower Sodium Foods.” One of many heart health items available in our catalog and at www.ncescatalog.com.  Item # 4023.